Montessori vs. daycare: what is the difference for your toddler?

Montessori vs. daycare: what is the difference for your toddler?

Montessori Vs. Daycare

Many parents are confused about the difference between a Montessori toddler program and a day care center. However, the best approach is to take a tour of the day care center and Montessori in Cypress before deciding. Let’s have a look at the difference between Montessori and daycare.

A Focus on Child-Led Exploration, Vs. Adult-Set Group Activities

If you visit the daycare, you will observe that they have adult-set schedules where the children are shuffled into a new activity every 20 to 40 minutes. The whole group moves together from one activity to another. On the other hand, Montessori toddler programs encourage child’s budding independence and self-discovery. Children have the liberty to choose their own activities.

A Calm, Orderly Environment, Vs. A Messy, Noisy Place

Many daycare settings have a high noise level, but the Montessori has a calm and organized ambience.

A 1:6 Ratio, Vs. A 1:12 Ratio

Most of the daycares switch to a 1: 12 ratio at the age of 2, to save money. A 1: 12 ratio makes it’s impossible to provide a quality learning experience for toddlers. At the age of 2, a child can’t dress independently and needs help using the toilet. In contrast, the 1: 6 ratio at Montessori till the age of 3 allows to teach children how to dress themselves and use the toilet.

Trained Teachers, Vs. Revolving-Door Daycare Providers

Most of the daycare staff has minimal training and also have high staff turnover. On the other hand, Montessori has trained staff with excellent credentials.

Grace and Courtesy, Vs. Group Conformity

In a Montessori program in 77433, the children are guided for developing grace and courtesy. Montessori aims at teaching individuals which is in contrast to the group conformity at daycare programs.

A Focus on Developing Inner Discipline, Vs. Obedience Training

While the daycare focuses on obedience training, the Montessori aims at developing inner discipline. The teachers don’t expect immediate obedience from children, nor reward them for good behavior. By setting the right environment they encourage children to do good and be good.